8th Infantry Illinois National Guard Association


INSIGNIA

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SIGNIFICANCE OF INSIGNIA OF THE 1/178th

The Block House at the top of the shield is "Old Fort Dearborn" and represent the "Illinois Troops.' The Blue Shield, symbolic of Infantry, represents Infantry Troops. The Roman Shield, partly obscured in the Blue Field on the left near the top, represents service in Cuba during the Spanish-American War, 1898-99. The Prickly Pear Cactus partly obscured in the Blue Field on the Right near the top, represents service on the Mexican Border in 1916.

The Entire triangular device, called the Semi-de-lis is representative of World War service in France. The Roman Sword and cactus are partly obscured as the service of the Regiment during the World War far overshadowed those services in Cuba and on the Mexican Border.

The Three White squares represent the Hindenburg Line. Ordinarily these would be placed on a line but the sharp point of the Semi-de-lis represents the piercing of the Hindenburg line by the Regiment and hence one is shoved downward.

The three Fleur-de-lis surrounding the French Helmets, is the Coat-of-Arms of the Department of Mause, France, (a state in France) in which the Regiment happened to be when the Hindenburg Line was pierced by the "Old Eighth." The Motto: "One Country, One Flag" is the Official motto of the Regiment.

This insignia has been approved by the War Department for this regiment and represents its complete history to date.

92D INFANTRY DIVISION

SSI, 92d Infantry Division

DUI, 92d Infantry Division

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia.
Description: Within a black circle 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in diameter and 1/8 inch (.32cm) of an inch in width upon an olive drab disc a black buffalo statant.

    Symbolism: The buffalo refers to the nickname of the division. It was inherited from the 367th Infantry, one of the first units of the division organized.
    Background: The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved by telegram on 6 Dec 1918. Distinctive Unit Insignia. Description: A silver colored metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18cm) in height overall, consisting of a blue four-pointed star bearing a silver fleur-de-lis enclosed by four silver conjoined "A's" on a silver four-pointed star all encircled in base a blue doubled silver and inscribed "FIRME ET FIDELI" (Steadfast and Faithfully) in silver letters.

    Symbolism: The design is based upon the fours "As" of Alabama enclosing the silver fleur-de-lis symbolic of the regiment's honors earned in France in World War I, all upon a blue background representing infantry.
    Background: The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 11 Jan 1943.

ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

Army National Guard emblem

Description: Centered on a light blue disc edged red, a representation of the Minute Man Statute by Daniel French in bronze detailed black facing to the right, all enclosed by a blue border bearing the words ARMY NATIONAL GUARD at the top and five stars below all in white.

Background: The device was authorized by NGR 750-58 for use in marking material. It was authorized as the seal for the Army National Guard on 28 August 1989.

HEADQUARTERS, STATE AREA COMMAND

ILLINOIS ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

Illinois Army National Guard Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Illinois Army National Guard Distinctive Unit Insignia

Illinois Army National Guard Crest for Coat of Arms

SHOULDER SLEEVE INSIGNIA

DISTINCTIVE UNIT INSIGNIA

CREST FOR COAT OF ARMS

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia.
Description: On a blue shield 3 1/2 inches (8.89 cm) in height and 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in width, a yellow silhouetted head of Abraham Lincoln.

Background: The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Illinois National Guard on 16 February 1949. The insignia was redesignated with description amended for the Headquarters, State Area Command, Illinois Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. Distinctive Unit Insignia.

Description: A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a green sprig of oak, consisting of two leaves and an acorn surmounting in base the gray blockhouse of old Fort Dearborn (that from the Illinois Army National Guard crest) and all above a red scroll, the ends terminating at opposite sides of the fort inscribed "WE ACCOMMODATE" in gold letters.

Symbolism: The sprig of oak, symbolic of valor, bravery and courage, together with the blockhouse of Fort Dearborn, one of the earliest and most famous of the military establishments of the United States in the Northwest territory, allude to the attributes and home area of the organization. The oak further refers to the state tree of Illinois.

Background: The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment and noncolor bearing units of the Illinois Army National Guard on 3 May 1971. The insignia was redesignated and amended to revise the description and symbolism for Headquarters, State Area Command, Illinois Army National Guard effective 30 December 1983.

Crest.
Description:
That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Illinois Army National Guard: From a wreath of colors, upon a grassy field the blockhouse of old Fort Dearborn Proper.

Symbolism: The Fort Dearborn Blockhouse represents one of the earliest and most famous of the military establishments of the United States in the Northwest Territory. While not the first place in Illinois to have an American garrison, it was in reality the first permanent fort established.

Background: The crest was approved for color bearing organizations of the State of Illinois on 5 February 1923. The crest was amended to change the wording of the approval on 14 August 1924.